Closure of Bollington Mothers’ Union Branch

As reported in our Annual report “it is with regret that we announce that this Branch has now discontinued our monthly meetings. The sad decision was taken due to a significant fall in membership (including the deaths of two faithful members from our congregation) and the difficulty of maintaining a regular programme of meetings alongside our other commitments.”

A closing service was held at St Oswald’s on Tuesday 28 May 2019 while celebrating our local Deanery MU Festival that evening.

Ever-loving Father,
we thank you for the work and witness of the Bollington branch of the Mothers’ Union:
for all by which it is remembered,
for all that it meant to those who belonged to it,
and those who were in any way helped by its members,
and for everything in its life which reflected your mercy and love.
We pray for the members who have departed this life,
and for those who have moved away.
We recall the happy times in the past.

6th Sunday of Easter 2019

Brian Reader

Acts 16: 9- 15; Rev 21: 10, 22 to 22: 5; Ps 67; John 14: 23-29.

Now this may seem a strange question but bear with me, it does have relevance. Does anyone remember this? [played on the organ by Jenny]

It is one of the Beatles hits which was released as a single 1967, over half a century ago.
I first preached on these readings back in 2004 – fifteen years ago, and I played a recording of the first part of the song. Then I was able to ask – How many of you remember the Beatles? But now perhaps I might have to ask a younger generation, have any of you heard of the Beatles? The lyrics were:

Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, love
There’s nothing you can do that can’t be done

Nothing you can sing that can’t be sung
Nothing you can say but you can learn how to play the game
It’s easy
Nothing you can make that can’t be made
No one you can save that can’t be saved
Nothing you can do but you can learn how to be you in time
It’s easy
All you need is love
All you need is love

Today is the last Sunday before the Jesus’ Ascension into Heaven. After His resurrection, Jesus had to remind his disciples what he had taught them about God and Himself. Now in today’s Gospel reading from St John, Jesus is trying to prepare them for what is about to happen. “I’ve told you this ahead of time, before it happens, so that when it does happen, it will deepen your belief in me.” It will also give them a better understanding of His love. In another translation, the passage starts: “If anyone loves me, he will carefully keep my word and my Father will love him.” If you read John’s Gospel, you will see that just before this passage, Jesus is talking a lot about love. Hence my being reminded of the old Beatles hit.

All you need is love. But is that true? Yes, if that love is for God and for our neighbours as Jesus commanded. Yes, if it is the selfless love that a parent should have for a child and a child for their parents, then it is good and honourable.

Regrettably, in today’s permissive world, with all the media and peer pressures put upon us, love is more likely to be selfish or just plain lust. So it is not surprising that David Shepherd, who as Bishop of Liverpool, the home of the Beatles, said, when speaking on permissiveness and human love – “If I was clever enough and good enough it would be all right to say, ‘Love is all you need’, but because I am neither clever enough, nor good enough, there is a need for signposts (or rules) to show that it is not the loving thing to go down (some) particular paths.”

And Jesus said, “Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them.”
What is Jesus’ word? It is His teaching and His commandments which we can read in the Bible. To sum up the whole message of the Gospel: Belief in and love of God, means belief in and love of Jesus. For St John the two are inseparable. There is no adequate faith in God apart from faith in Jesus.

At the time of Christ’s passion, the disciples were worried and upset by the talk of His betrayal and the thought of Jesus leaving them. Jesus himself knew the effect his death had on them all. And so He is trying to explain and to get them to understand why it has to happen; that the time was coming when Jesus would no longer be physically present with them. However, His return to God will be for their good: it will bring a new power for action, together with a new certainty in prayer. If Jesus is to leave them, how can He be the ‘way’ to God when He is no longer there? The answer lies in the two successors to Jesus’ ministry named in this chapter.

One successor is the Holy Spirit. Jesus promises the disciples that they will not be left ‘orphaned’; he will send a ‘Helper’ , a ‘comforter’ or a ‘Counsellor’ for them – the Holy Spirit. The resurrection of Jesus will bring not only the promise of eternal life for the believers, but also his living presence through the Holy Spirit.

The Spirit will help the disciples remember and apply Jesus’ teachings to life after His ascension and give them the courage to endure the persecutions which will follow. And two weeks ago Anne spoke of the persecutions which are still taking place in the world today. Best of all, the Holy Spirit will come to be with them always and everywhere (not limited by a physical body as Jesus had been). The Spirit will teach and counsel and bring to mind all that Jesus has said. And Jesus’ own unshakeable peace will be theirs.

But there is a second successor, the church. With the promise comes a commission. Jesus promises that those who believe in him will “do what I have been doing. He will do even greater things than these”. So Christians can continue Jesus’ work. ‘Greater things’ does not mean more spectacular – it would be hard to outdo the resurrection! But the world-wide mission of the church does take the ministry of Jesus far beyond the bounds of His earthly ministry. The Holy Spirit is the power for this ministry. And our contribution lies in obeying Jesus and his teaching. Love of Christ and obedience are tied intimately together in this passage.

For all those who follow him, Jesus offers his ‘peace’. Note: the peace that Jesus offers his disciples is not the peace of an easy life. It is the peace of the obedient servant who has the full confidence and support of his master, and who carries out his commission effectively and joyfully.

With His death Jesus made the approach-road for men and women to come to God. His resurrection enables His return to the Father, and His ascension enables Him to get a permanent home ready for his disciples, and in due course he will come again for them. And we are included in that promise if we follow Him as His disciples today. We have seen that as disciples, we must continue to love and trust Jesus Christ. And the way we can show our love is to do all that he says and commands.

As we have seen, the Beatles’ phrase ‘All you need is love’ is not enough. It also requires prayerful action, commitment and courage to follow Christ. In the Beatles song we hear – ‘It’s easy, love is all you need’. But Jesus never said it would be easy, or without hardship, for the Christians who follow Him, but we know that with the help of the Holy Spirit all things are possible. Jesus’ ascension, His returning to the Father is the culmination, the completion of Jesus’ work as a man here on earth. It is the crowning of the Easter story – Hallelujah!

4th Sunday of Easter 2019

Anne Coomes

“My sheep listen to my voice, they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one will snatch them out of my hand.” 
John 10 27

No one will snatch them out of my hand. 

Yet today, there are many countries where the authorities are trying to do just that. To snatch Christians away from Jesus Christ, by persecuting them or even killing them. Just how bad is this persecution? Well, as you know, following the outcry over Asia Bibi, the Christian woman cleared of blasphemy in Pakistan late last year, the Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt commissioned the Bishop of Truro, the Rt Rev Philip Mounstephen, to carry out an independent review on the persecution of Christians worldwide.

Bishop Mounstephen was a good choice, because he used to head up the Church Mission Society, and in that role has worked with persecuted Christians in many countries.

Well, you’ll remember that on 3rd May, only about 10 days ago, the bishop published his interim report, and the findings made our national headlines. The report found that ‘religious persecution is a global phenomenon that is growing in scale and intensity’ and that there is ‘widespread evidence showing that Christians are by far the most widely persecuted religion’. Acts of violence ‘are on the rise, with an increase in the severity of anti-Christian persecution.’

As of 2019, 245 million Christians worldwide suffer high levels of persecution or worse. This is up 30 million up on 2018. That’s one in ten Christians globally. In Asia the statistics are even more shocking, with one in three Christians at risk of severe persecution. As for the persecution in the Middle East and Africa, it has reached such a ‘vast scale’ that it is arguably coming close to meeting the international definition of genocide, according to that adopted by the UN. Christians in Palestine now represent less than 1.5% of the population, while in Iraq they have fallen from 1.5 million to less than 120,000 in just 16 years.

The main impact of such genocidal acts is exodus. Christianity now faces being wiped-out in parts of the Middle East. In fact, ‘The eradication of Christians and other minorities on pain of the sword or other violent means is… the specific and stated objective of extremist groups in Syria, Iraq, Egypt, North-East Nigeria and the Philippines.’ These groups want to stamp out all evidence of Christianity. They remove crosses, tear down or bomb churches (think of the attack in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday), abduct and kill the clergy.

But it is not just extremist groups. It is governments. In many countries to be a Christian is to risk arrest, imprisonment, and torture – for no other reason than that you believe in Jesus. For the report warns of an increasing threat from ‘aggressive nationalism in countries such as China, as well as from Islamist militia groups.’ For example, in India, ‘there is a growing narrative that to be Indian is to be Hindu.’

The report then analysed persecution around the world.

Christians in the Middle East and Africa use to be 20 per cent of the population – 100 years ago. Today, they are less than 4 per cent. In South East Asia, such as India and Nepal, militant nationalists are demanding anti-conversion laws. In other words, to make it illegal to even become a Christian. In sub-Saharan Africa, such as Nigeria there are the militant Islamists Boko Haram and the Fulani herdsmen.  Their specific aim is to eliminate all Christianity and thus pave the way for the total Islamisation of the country.

And so in Nigeria alone, hundreds of Christians are being killed every single month. During 2018, far more Christians in Nigeria were killed in violence than anywhere else in the world. What about East Asia?  Well, North Korea has been the most dangerous country in the world for Christians for the past 18 years. Here Christians face arrest, interrogation, severe torture, imprisonment and often execution. Over in China, the Government is currently demolishing church buildings and tearing down crosses. In Laos, Vietnam and Myanmar (Burma), again the growing influence of Islamic militancy… is driving persecution of Christians in the region. In Central Asia? The report says that ‘the situation for Christians is bleak, as authorities have further enforced a widespread crackdown on churches.  

All in all, Bishop Mounstephen has said: “Through my previous experience… I was aware of the terrible reality of persecution. But to be honest in preparing this report, I’ve been truly shocked by the severity, scale and scope of the problem.”

For of course the New Testament was always clear that to be a Christian is to face persecution. 

Matthew 5 11: Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven,

Mark 8 35: For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me and for the gospel will save it.

Luke 21 12-15: But before all this, they will seize you and persecute you. They will hand you over to synagogues and put you in prison, and you will be brought before kings and governors, and all on account of my name. And so you will bear testimony to me. 

John 15 18: If the world hates you, keep in mind that it hated me first. Remember what I told you: ‘A servant is not greater than his master.’  If they persecuted me, they will persecute you also. 

Romans 8 35: Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

2 Corinthians 4 8-10:  We are hard pressed on every side, but not crushed; perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not abandoned; struck down, but not destroyed. 

2 Timothy 3 12: In fact, everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted.

1 Peter 3 14: But even if you should suffer for what is right, you are blessed. Do not fear their threats; do not be frightened.

1 Peter 4 12: Dear friends, do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal that has come on you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you.

So going back to our Bible readings this morning, it is not often that you can pick up a national news story and link it directly with the Bible, but when you compare the Mounstephen interim report with our reading this morning from Revelation, the similarities are striking: 

Revelation reads:  ‘there before me was a great multitude that no one could count, from every nation, tribe, people and language, standing before the throne and before the Lamb. They were wearing white robes and were holding palm branches in their hands. And they cried out in a loud voice: “Salvation belongs to our God, who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb.” Then one of the elders asked me, “These in white robes—who are they, and where did they come from? I answered, “Sir, you know.” And he said, “These are they who have come out of the great tribulation; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. Therefore, they are before the throne of God and serve him day and night in his temple; and he who sits on the throne will shelter them with his presence. Never again will they hunger; never again will they thirst. The sun will not beat down on them, nor any scorching heat. For the Lamb at the centre of the throne will be their shepherd; he will lead them to springs of living water. And God will wipe away every tear from their eyes.’ 

St John’s Church Choir – 1965(ish)

The picture includes the curate Revd John Richard Haynes, who was at St John’s from 1963 to 1967, so the picture must be from that period.

Back Row from left: Christopher Patrick, Guy Gorham, ?, Frank Pegg, Fred Hutchinson, Frank Green, ? , John Brogden, Gwilym Humphreys, ?

Middle row from left: Pat Kershaw, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, Harry Holland, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, Jaqueline Clayton (Pengelly)

Front row from left: ?, ?, Edward Heaps?, ?, ?, Geoff Newcombe, Revd J St H Mullett, Albert Clayton, Revd J R Haynes, Barry Patrick?, Hedley Patrick.

More detail: Guy Gorham was the great-grandson of Revd George Cornelius Gorham, who caused a great controversy in the Church of England in 1847 when he was accused of holding Calvanistic views on Baptism (“The Gorham Case“). Fred Hutchinson was a Police Constable. Gwilym Humphreys was headmaster of St John’s School. Harry Holland was the verger. Edward Heaps was the organist (and is presumably third from left in the front row, wearing an organist’s sleeveless surplice). Geoff Newcombe and Albert Clayton were the wardens. Revd John Haynes went to Rhodesia/Zimbabwe for 20 years from 1970 before returning to the UK as vicar of Bishop’s Stortford. He retired to Scarborough where he died in 2016. You can read more about Revd John St Hilary MULLETT and other former vicars here.

If YOU can supply any more details about the photo, please let us know.

2nd Sunday of Easter 2019

Brian Reader

Acts 5:27-32 / Ps: 150/ Rev 1:4-8 / John 20:19-31 /

Today is sometimes known as Low Sunday, after all the excitement of Easter Sunday. It is also a time when Cathedral choirs are away on holiday. This is good, because it allows good parish choirs to fulfil the role of relief choir in a cathedral setting, and I consider myself very lucky to have had the opportunity to sing with relief choirs at Bury St. Edmund’s, Gloucester Cathedral, and twice at St. David’s.

So what impact did this Easter have on you? For me it surprised me in a number of different ways; ways I did not expect and ways I did not choose.

Firstly there was the Lent group, movingly centred on the book ‘The Nail’, some portions of which Veronica used in the services leading up to Easter. It was a good Lent course as it made us realise that through our sins, we all had a responsibility for nailing Jesus to the cross. But it wasn’t nails that held him to the cross – it was His love for us. And then last Sunday we had our Easter services to celebrate Christ’s glorious resurrection, and we met the risen Lord at the communion table. In the past I can remember waking up on Easter morning to find snow covering the daffodils. But not this year; Easter was late and we had fine weather! The daffodils may have faded, but the bluebells were out and the trees had a good covering of new leaves. For those of you who made the early Easter service it was magical. The sky was clear with an almost full moon and a couple of pink contrails crossing the dark blue sky; with the dawn chorus in almost full throat. Even the weather was warm and we didn’t really need the blazing fire, as we filed into a dark church with our candles burning. If you have never been to one of Veronica’s early Easter services, I certainly recommend it, as it is an experience never to be forgotten. And the 10.30 service was also memorable. We had a double Christening, and multiple Christenings at Easter used to be a feature of the early Church.

Today’s reading, taken from St. John’s Gospel, is part of the continuing resurrection story. Jesus appears in a locked room to some, but not to all the disciples, and he commissions them. “Just as my Father sent me, I send you.” But Thomas, the twin, was not there, and when they told him that they had seen the Master, he said that he would not believe unless he too could see the marks of the crucifixion on His Lord. Poor Thomas, nicknamed ‘doubting’ for the rest of time.

Why did he doubt; why is this story recorded? Just imagine if this had been a communist story, or even the report of an event or a meeting by a modern political party, would they have written anything about anyone possibly having doubts? Most unlikely. This part of the story would receive spin, it would be glossed over, or edited out. But some doubting is normal, it is not improper, unless it is hidden and not faced and overcome. So why was this bit about doubting Thomas recorded, and why did Matthew also record that some doubted? Well the Gospel writers would not have made it up, so it can be regarded as true. And if the doubting is true, then all the other resurrection eye witness reports can also be taken as true.

Back in 2004 there was a lot of hoo-ha about the film – ‘The passion of the Christ’. I saw the film, with all the gore and violence, and I think it gave me a better understanding of Christ’s love and the suffering He endured for me, for you, and for the whole world. We know that Pilate was pressurised by the Jewish priests but as the Roman governor, he was very happy to use their false accusations to rid himself of a possible trouble maker. Christ who came teaching love and justice for all, was put to death unjustly because of the fear and hatred of a powerful few. One thing that the film ‘The Passion of the Christ’ forcibly recalled to mind, was the great trauma that the two Marys and all the disciples felt as events unfolded leading up to the flogging and terrible death of their beloved Master.

Would I have denied Christ like Peter? Probably. Why stick out and be another victim when all you have worked for and believed in is being swept aside, rejected, and nullified before your very eyes? They did not know that he was to return, to make all things new, to gladden the heart and stiffen the sinew. He tried to tell them, but they just didn’t understand. Yet return to life He did. Risen in a new body which they failed to recognised till he spoke their name, broke bread in thanksgiving, or said “Peace be with you.” He also taught them afresh about himself – as the Son of God, and of God His Father, and He spoke of the Holy Spirit, who would come to fire them up for their work in the days to come.

Tom Wright, who was the Bishop of Durham, has said that “there is little justification for being a Christian unless one accepts that the Resurrection is a matter of historical fact.” In his TV programme ‘Resurrection’, he took an historical journey to the places where Jesus lived and died, in an attempt to build up a picture of what really happened in Jerusalem some 2000 years ago. He showed that the cross was not the end – NO, that was just the beginning.

The Resurrection that followed was an event of cataclysmic proportions which changed the way mankind viewed life and death for ever. The resurrection rejuvenated the grieving disciples. It galvanised the young Church which spread the Gospel through the eastern world like wildfire. It gave a faith in Jesus Christ by which, men and women were prepared to live their lives, and if – as was sometimes necessary – a faith to die for.

This is our faith, and yet we too sometimes doubt just like Thomas. He was able to see and feel the wounds inflicted on Jesus, and we can’t. We can’t prove there is a God in any scientific way, yet we can prove that Christ did live, that he was crucified unjustly for our sins, and that he did rise again. And Jesus tells us through his disciples and scriptures, that if we have seen Him, (or know Him as our personal saviour) then we have seen and know God the Father. And so we can believe with our minds and have faith, but we also need to trust with our hearts and reach out for His ever forgiving love.

He said, “Peace be with you.” So cast your doubts away, Jesus lives, Hallelujah!

Bishop of Chester to retire.

Bishop Peter has announced that he will be retiring on 30 September this year. He has served as the 40th Bishop of Chester since 1996.

Official portrait of The Lord Bishop of Chester – by Chris McAndrew

Bishop Keith (Birkenhead) will become acting Bishop of Chester from 1 October until Bishop Peter’s successor is in post. No Suffragan Bishop of Stockport will be appointed before we have a new Bishop of Chester.

Putting the final piece into our mosaic – May 2014

Veronica made Honorary Canon of Chester Cathedral – March 2014