Saint Monica of Hippo

Canon Roy Arnold

I served my first curacy in Bristol where I discovered that in Bristol gym pumps became dabs, plain tea cakes became baps and unsmoked bacon was known as green bacon, and that natives of that city have a habit of adding an L to words which end with A. So (for instance) when they say the word AREA they pronounce it as AERIAL. I remember an old lady once telling me that her son in the army served in Indial, Burmal and Malayal and suffered from Malarial as a consequence.

My first Vicar knowing all about this was once taking a Baptism and the baby’s name was Monica and when he asked the question: “Name this child”, the parents solemnly answered MONICAL to which my Vicar replied “I don’t mind calling her MONACLE so long as she doesn’t make a SPECTACLE of herself during the service!”

Well today we remember another Monica; Saint Monica who was born in North Africa in the year 332 and went on to be the Mother of St Augustine of Hippo (not to be confused with Augustine of Canterbury). Augustine of Hippo – one of the most famous teachers of the early Church – always attributed his conversion to Christianity to the prayers of his mother Monica, not least when he started to stray from the straight and narrow, which is why she has always been held up as a real example of a mother’s love and prayers.

And when you think of it our prayers for family and friends are truly expressions of our love for them; and I believe there may be few things more important that we can do than to pray for our loved ones and anyone else that they may come to know – as we have – the love of Jesus and the true value of his Church. Maybe we don’t do this enough, and I must admit that I have totally failed in this. We pray in a general way for their wellbeing and health and safekeeping… but as to praying for their spiritual wellbeing and perhaps conversion we maybe fail in this important aspect of their lives.

Monica didn’t fail in this for her son Augustine, and without a doubt we must try to follow her example, even though Augustine was not without his faults. He certainly would have opposed the Ordination of Women and it was said that he would never sit on a seat when a woman had sat on it, which goes to show that even saints are not without their faults even when his mother (a woman) had done so much for him – and as Veronica does for us all.

 

Those who abide in Me

Revd Michael Fox

There is a song from 1980 by the punk band The Clash – I expect you all still remember it – called Should I Stay or Should I Go? It was very high energy and I’m not going to sing it to you, but the lyrics went:

Darlin’ you got to let me knowTheClash
Should I stay or should I go?
If you say that you are mine
I’ll be here ’til the end of time
So you got to let me know
Should I stay or should I go?

Joe Strummer seems to be putting his fate into the hands of (I presume) a young woman, but he sums up an anxiety that affects all of us in some way – where do I belong? Is it with this person, this community, this group or with that one? Am I wanted here, or would I be better off somewhere else?

Indeed staying anywhere, or with anyone, for any length of time is increasingly difficult for us in a commitment-phobic world. There is a restlessness that afflicts humans sooner or later and sends them wandering off looking for better pasture. Perhaps it stems from the genes inherited from the period when humans were hunter-gatherers, roaming the prairies looking for woolly mammoths.

The word abide is old-fashioned now, but it has lots of meanings – to dwell, to rest, to continue, to be true to, to remain, to wait, to await… We say “I will abide by that decision,” or “I can’t abide punk rock music” and I suppose in both cases we mean ‘live with.’ And of course we use the word ‘abode’ – jokingly nowadays – to mean home: “Welcome to my humble abode.”

And at the moment there is a so-called ‘migrant crisis’ where people are fleeing war, oppression, hunger, poverty – they are leaving home and all that word implies of roots, shelter, identity, security, and casting themselves upon the waters, in small fragile boats. They face an unknown future, unknown dangers including drowning, tear gas and stun grenades, hunger, thirst, hostility, rejection.

If you saw the BBC’s Songs of Praise programme with its report on the migrant camp in Calais – the link is on our St. Oswald’s facebook page – you’ll have seen that in the midst of an area known as ‘the jungle’, in Calais, a muddy, rubbish-strewn encampment of tents, some made from corrugated plastic or old iron, there is a church – a makeshift, wood and plastic building that stands shakily in the midst of the camp. One of the French Christian volunteers who helped the Christian migrants build the church says on camera “These people wanted a church before they wanted a home.”

CalaisJungleChurchInside this little church Christians from Ethiopia and Eritrea, Syria and many other countries meet to pray and worship. There are beautiful pictures – one of St. Michael after whom the church is named. They worship and pray together with the many French and English Christians who come to bring aid and fellowship and hope.

One young man, a theology student from Ethiopia, is one of leaders of the church there. He says he has fled from persecution but he will not make any attempt to enter the UK illegally. Another young Christian man also fleeing persecution in Eritrea has tried several times to board a train illegally. When challenged he says he is seeking a better home, a safer home. He prays every day and then he says, “I have another house – it’s heaven.”

It seems to me that little church – St. Michael’s – is the embodiment of what John, in his gospel this morning, is telling us about abiding. Those who meet together in the fellowship of the Eucharist know what it is to dwell with Christ. However tough life is, however lacking in security, their commitment to follow him and to worship him and to receive him is a sign that they are in the dwelling place of God himself.

The Eucharist, the practice of eating bread and drinking wine in memory of the crucified Christ and in fellowship with the risen Christ, is clearly what John, writing in the hungry times of the first century AD – is referring to. Some people think John was writing in Syria, the very place from which many modern-day migrants come.

At the back of John’s image of finding fellowship with Christ in the Eucharist – of living, staying with, awaiting, staying true to Christ – is the experience of the Jews wandering in the wilderness, being fed with the manna from heaven. God provides for them and sustains them in their desperate need. They were in a strange land, and they were migrants, aiming to live in someone else’s country.

For John, Jesus is the manna that God gives to all humanity, regardless of who they are, of where they are living. He is the spiritual food that gives us life. And it’s significant that the word John uses for abide in this section is used 40 times throughout the gospel – his Gospel is all about what it means to live with Jesus, and for Jesus to live with you. Of course the breaking of bread, the sharing of a meal, is one of the most basic things we do in our homes.

Those of us here this morning, we have homes. Some of us may have just moved in, with all the excitement of a new space, new neighbours, and the adventure of a new life in a place we have chosen. Or we have been in our home for many years, seen our families grow up, experienced joy, and also sadness and loss. It has been a refuge and a shelter, a place for us to be ourselves. It answers our most basic need. Perhaps, even, we are facing a move from our familiar home and facing the loss of familiar surroundings and friends’ faces.

I wonder how many of us would say, with the migrants of Calais, that we wanted a church before we wanted a home? But when we meet to celebrate the Eucharist, as we will do in a few moments, we enact the meeting of our earthly home and our heavenly one, as that young man in Calais reminds us.

Perhaps that will help us to remember to keep our earthly home always open to the stranger, the migrant, to the needs of others for shelter and food. But most importantly to remember that whether we stay or go, it is Christ who sustains us, shelters us, and who is the true meaning of ‘home’.

Amen

 

The former Holy Trinity church at Kerridge

Visit by some parishioners

Thanks to the kind hospitality of the present owner, a group of parishioners visited the former Holy Trinity Church in Kerridge this afternoon! The building has been imaginatively transformed into a delightful home which has kept all the beauty of the church whilst offering an incredibly versatile, warm and welcoming living space. May God bless all who dwell there, now and in the future!