Coming up at Foxhill

Forgiveness: Becoming a Community of Forgiveness
led by Revd Wes Sutton Thursday 3rd May 2018.
This day examines how the church can become a community of forgiveness and what that looks like in real life. It looks at the theological and ethical issues surrounding forgiveness and how Jesus’ teaching ran contrary to the norms of his day – as it does ours. We will also consider what the impact of forgiveness is on us and others and how the church can model the forgiving heart of God to the world.
These are stand-alone days held in partnership with Acorn – all are welcome to attend. Each day begins with tea and coffee at 9.30am and finishes at 4pm. Booking forms are available from foxhill@chester.anglican.org or tel: 01928 733777
£27.50pp – Includes lunch and refreshments


Ascension Quiet Day with Trevor Dennis 10th May 2018
9.30am – 4pm

Let’s celebrate God to the skies this Ascension Day… But what kind of God will we celebrate?

So much of the language we use of God is drawn from the world of men of power – but after Jesus of Nazareth, how appropriate is it?
The Bible has some surprises up its sleeve, and has other ways of talking to suggest, other ways of experiencing and praying. link to website
£27.50pp inc. lunch and refreshments.


Thy Kingdom Come – Bringing out the God colours in the world!
with Revd Lynn Weston 14th May 2018
We shall use prayer and reflection to seek God’s discernment as we pray ‘Thy Kingdom Come’. How might God be asking us to bring his colours into the world? What might God be asking of us individually and corporately as we play our part in making change in the world? How can we reach those who don’t yet know Christ, considering that we just might be the answer to our prayers?
These mini retreats are a chance to step back from your busyness, and listen to what God is saying to you.
Each day starts with coffee at 9.30am and ends with tea at 3.30pm.  Booking forms available from: Foxhill@chester.anglican.org or call 01928 733777
£22 including refreshments and a light lunch 


Celtic Treasures – Light from the past to inspire and illumine our lives today led by Revd Roy Searle – A leader of the Northumbria Community
21st – 23rd September

Celtic Christian spirituality was forged on the anvil of a changing world. Roy will explore treasures from the stories and traditions of the past that can bring hope, inspiration and light to our life and faith journeys in our changing contemporary church and world. link to event calendar
£165pp incl. en-suite accommodation, meals and refreshments.


Foxhill House and Woodlands is set within 70 acres of beautiful Cheshire countryside. We can accommodate up to 28 guests overnight, and cater for up to 80 people. We have rooms suitable for meetings of between 2 and 80 people. Our life is centred around our chapel, where we pray daily and offer a regular pattern of worship. The chapel may also be available for groups to use as part of their visit. Telephone: 01928 733 777 Email: foxhill@chester.anglican.org

Foxhill House and Woodlands
Tarvin Road
Frodsham
Cheshire
WA6 6XB

2nd Sunday of Easter 2018

Canon Roy Arnold

In the evening of that same day, the first day of the week, the doors were closed in the room where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews. Jesus came and stood among them. He said to them, ‘Peace be with you’, and showed them his hands and his side. The disciples were filled with joy when they saw the Lord, and he said to them again, ‘Peace be with you’.


Bollington, we believe, came into being in Anglo-Saxon times, as did the small word “if” – a word that can convey many meanings, not least to do with doubt. As in “If it’s nice next Sunday we will go for a picnic” or “If I pick the winner of the Grand National I will take you out for a meal”.

But if we add the word “only” – as in “If only” – it changes from doubt to regret. So if only I hadn’t fallen down nine stone steps at the Bull’s Head in March 2017, I wouldn’t still be on crutches, and Hylda and I wouldn’t have experienced one of the worst years of our lives.

But accidents apart, the words “If only” can express other types of regret, as in “If only I hadn’t quarrelled with my brother” or “If only I had written that letter”. If you think about it, we might count those “If only” moments as sins – things done wrong or things not done right; things that can spoil our personal lives, or the life of the whole world.

Which is where Easter, and Jesus the Son of God enters through our locked doors, comes in and says “Peace be with you” as he said to the Apostles – Well, all but two of them – Judas and Thomas, the Thomas whose day we keep today. He had not been there when Jesus spoke those words of peace. Perhaps he had been experiencing one of those “If only” moments. If only it could be true about Jesus being raised from the dead. if only.

But then, so we are told, it really was true. Jesus had risen from the dead – as Thomas found out when he touched the wounds in the hands of Jesus. Then the doubts of Thomas disappeared – as they can for me and you if we can believe that Jesus does take away all our regretful “Ifs” and know ourselves to be forgiven through the love of God. And find ourselves in the middle of a Special Offer for Easter – two for one – not only our sins forgiven, but (as well) the hope of heaven, in the closer presence of God, and of those whom we have loved and lost a while.

Thomas was given the proof for which he craved when he met the risen Jesus. But for the time being, we must walk by the light of faith and with all our “Ifs” and “Buts” through our nights and days of doubt or joy. Onwards let us go, singing songs of expectation, marching to the promised land;
letting the love of Jesus fill us,
the joy of Jesus surprise us,
the peace of Jesus flood us,
the light of Jesus transform us,
the touch of Jesus warm us.

O Saviour Jesus, forgive us,
and in your wounds, heal us.
and in your risen life, take us with you,
to stay with us, and us with You.

Amen

Edith Mary Oldfield RIP

It was with much sadness that we learnt of the recent death of Edith Mary Oldfield (nee Nolan), a lifelong member of Bollington Parish who was a regular worshipper with friends and family here, principally at Holy Trinity Church, Kerridge.

Mary was born on 9 February 1917 at Wellington Road in Bollington. Following her wedding at St Oswald’s Church on 22 July 1940, her early married life was spent at Redway in Kerridge before moving 33 years ago to South West Avenue. Thanks to the dedicated care of her daughter Hilary, Mary was able to remain living independently at home until her death on 10 March 2018, having reached the great age of 101 years old. It seemed that seven was a lucky number for Mary: both she and her late husband Jack (from Jackson Lane, Kerridge) coincidentally grew up as one of seven children in each of their families, and just before WW2 their romance began to blossom when with a group of young friends they used to walk down Seven Sisters (now Flash Lane) to socialise in Prestbury.

Mary was a person of great faith, willing to serve others in the most humble and practical ways – she regularly baked delicious scones and almond slices for church fetes and took pride in scrubbing the stonework at the entrance of Holy Trinity Church, which consequently had the cleanest doorsteps in the whole parish! She took part in the final celebration service in September 2009 at Holy Trinity when balloons were let go of, symbolising our positive faith for the future. Mary admired the subsequent conversion of Kerridge Church into a splendid dwelling and along with over 800 other local people in 2014 here at St Oswald’s she placed a tile in the community mosaic which adorns the much needed new extension that was funded by the proceeds from the sale of Holy Trinity.

Mary was one of the kindest people you could meet, who was always genuinely interested in others rather than dwelling on any of the increasing infirmities that came upon her in later years. Her family was very important to her and she was a delight to visit, invariably having a twinkle in her eye and a whispered blessing for every welcome guest. May she rest in peace and rise in glory.