Our Parish Registers online

It is now possible to research a number of our parish registers on our main website here. The available records include:

Baptisms at St John’s, St Oswald’s and Holy Trinity Kerridge from 1834 to 2006 – a total of nearly 7,600 records.

Marriages at St John’s from 1838 to 1959 and St Oswald’s from 1937 to 1954 – a total of over 1,470 records. (There were no marriages at St Oswald’s before 1937, and no marriages at all at Holy Trinity Kerridge.) For the time being it is NOT proposed to publish more recent marriage records online for Data Protection reasons.

Burials at St John’s Churchyard and Columbarium from 1835 to 2017 – a total of about 8,000 records.

Memorial Inscriptions at St John’s Churchyard and Columbarium from 1835 to 2017 – over 1,400 records.

 

 

Are you in this picture?

While researching for the page on Former Vicars of Bollington, this picture was obtained from the Bollington Photo Archive. It shows a group outside the former Holy Trinity Church, Kerridge.

There are two clergymen in the picture. On the left is Revd Reginald Norton Betts (vicar 1929-1937) standing next to Revd John Kingdon (vicar 1937 to 1947). We think that the picture was taken about 1946.

If you can name other people in the picture or fix the date or occasion, please let us know by e-mail.

The Dedication of the Columbarium 30 November 1961

The first interments of cremated remains took place in the newly created Columbarium in 1958, but the “official” Dedication Service took place in 1961.

Towards the left of the picture is Albert Clayton, holding his Churchwarden’s staff. Next to him is Revd Michael Culliford curate (who lived in St Oswald’s House, Bollington Cross). The Bishop of Chester was Rt Revd Gerald Ellison (who went on to be Bishop of London). Next to the Bishop is Revd John St Hilary Mullett vicar, and next to him is Revd Trevor Hill curate. The man in the dark cassock towards the right of the photo is Harry Holland verger.

New War Memorial Extension

The original Bollington War Memorial was dedicated in November 1920. It is a simple sandstone cross with names inscribed around the base. At that time it was not envisaged that space for additional names would be needed only a couple of decades later, so the WW2 names had to be added wherever they would fit. The memorial is beginning to suffer from weathering of the relatively soft sandstone.
As part of the Commemoration of the Centenary of the outbreak of World War 1, it was decided to raise funds to renovate or upgrade our Bollington War Memorial. Experts advised that attempting to re-inscribe names on the existing sandstone was not a viable option. It was therefore decided to create an extension to the original memorial in the form of two panels positioned so as to “guard” the old memorial, which will remain in position.
Extensive research was carried out to find the names of World War casualties from Bollington who had not been included on the original memorial, as well as making a couple of corrections to names that had been wrongly inscribed previously. A committee was formed to decide upon the final list of names. The new panels show the missing names as well as those of all the casualties commemorated on the original memorial. Space has been left in case any additional casualties’ names need to be added in future.
A substantial grant was provided by Cheshire East Council. Bollington Town Council also provided a grant and the Mayor’s Fund (Councillor Amanda Stott) was dedicated to the project. Other funds were provided by members of the public. The stone came from Sycamore Quarries, the engraving was carried out by William Warburton and construction of the extension was by John Drabble & Son.
A new War Memorial extension at Bollington has been installed in the War Memorial Gardens. This includes all the names on the existing War Memorial (including a few corrections), as well as names of local WW1 casualties whose names were not previously listed. The two lists of names stand like two companies of soldiers guarding the old memorial.
The memorial extension was officially inaugurated at a short ceremony on Sunday 11 October 2015.
In the late summer sunshine, the old memorial casts its shadow across one of the new guardians. No breeze disturbs the Union Flag in the Memorial Gardens.
The War Memorial in 1920
The War Memorial in 1920