Venice 2016

A Room with a View

Yes, I know that was set in Florence, but this room is in Venice with a view out across the lagoon. It’s in the apartment where Veronica has been staying for the first part of her sabbatical.

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Another room with a view

The little bakery close to the apartment where you can also get an ice-cream, or even sit and watch the traffic on the Giudecca Canal while you sip a gin and tonic…

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Torcello

TorcelloThe bell tower is finally free of scaffolding, after several years of restoration.

Below is a more distant view on a different day, with the snow-capped Alps behind.

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Saint Mark’s Cathedral

The mosaic above where we sat on Sunday morning shows (at the centre) the angel showing the women the empty tomb on the first Easter Day.

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Views across the Guidecca Canal
The part of Venice where Veronica has been staying is more residential, less “touristy” than many other areas. These views are looking across to the main part of the city. The Giudecca Canal is a bit like a bypass for the Grand Canal, which is behind the buildings on the opposite bank.

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Holiday in Venice 2014

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A few holiday snaps from Veronica and Dave’s recent trip to Venice…

 


 

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Torcello…
…is a sparsely populated island at the northern end of the Venetian lagoon. It was probably the first of the islands to be populated following the fall of the Roman Empire. The Cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta contains a 12th Century mosaic of the Last Judgement. The 11th century bell tower has been under repair for the last couple of years.

The Devil’s Bridge at Torcello, and some more godly symbols on houses nearby.


Burano
According to legend, the houses at Burano were brightly coloured so that the fishermen could more easily find their own homes after celebrating a successful day’s work.

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St Mark’s Basilica
Some of the gold mosaic ceilings date from about 1070, but about two thirds were “restored” in the 18th and 19th century.