Afternoon Tea at St Oswald’s – All Welcome

Sunday 1 July 2018

An event to raise funds for the work of the parish.

Sunday Afternoon Tea will be served again on 1 July from 3pm to 5pm! Join us to enjoy cakes, company and crafts and cake. There will be a short performance by our Puppet Group.

Here are a few pictures from last month’s event:

 

Coming up at Foxhill- Weekend led by Veronica

7th-9th September 2018
The Harvest of our Lives Led by Canon Veronica Hydon

A creative weekend using a variety of art and craft materials to explore and celebrate different skills each of us have discovered, practised and developed during our lifetimes in a range of work and leisure contexts, and sharing how God has blessed and encouraged us along the way.

This weekend will be contemplative as well as companionable. A time for greater appreciation of our own achievements as labourers in God’s Harvest.

£165pp including all meals & en-suite accommodation

To book: phone 01928 733777 or email foxhill@chester.anglican.org
For more information please visit: www.foxhillchester.co.uk
facebook @FoxhillCD

Foxhill House and Woodlands, Tarvin Road, Frodsham WA6 6XB
The Diocese of Chester centre for prayer, study & mission

Bollington Open Gardens

Saturday 16 and Sunday 17 June 2018

Enjoy a walk through Bollington and visit 16 gardens from 10am to 4pm on both days.

Tickets and maps available from Bollington Leisure Centre, Town Hall and local businesses and participating gardens on the day. £5 per person (children free).

Tea and cakes available at the market place on High Street. Bouncy castle and refreshments also available at Water Street Pre-School.

All proceeds to Bollington Festival 2019.

Trinity Sunday 2018

Isaiah 6:1-8; Ps 29; Romans 8:12-17; John 3:1-17

Brian Reader

Those of you who were here last Sunday will remember that the service was taken by Rev’d Dr. Christopher Swift. He told me of a surprising headline in a Cambridge local newspaper which reported “Anglican Christians sunk by Trinity“. This extraordinary headline is explained by the fact that Westcott House, a Church of England theological College and Trinity College were engaged in the ‘Bumps’, a rowing race where boats are sent off at intervals and gain places by catching and touching the boat ahead. On this occasion the ‘bump’ was more aggressive than usual and the boat sank. And why did Dr. Swift remember this?  Well he was rowing in the Westcott boat, and got an early bath! Back to today.

When I first looked at the readings for today I was disappointed for two reasons. Firstly, it appeared to have no immediate link with the ‘Trinity’; the fact that God is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and secondly, because the subject matter was difficult to understand. So where would I start and what could I say?

Mind you I did have a connection with the verse John 3, 16. It was on Palm Sunday back in 1943, when a Beach Missionary came to visit the Plymouth Brethren Chapel where my family used to worship. At the end of the evening service, he did a ‘Billy Graham’, and asked if anyone wished to give their life to Christ, and I went up. Later we had a talk, and after I had convinced him that I was sure about the step I had taken, he showed me the text of John 3 16, saying that throughout his life he had found great strength in the words, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.” I commend it to you.

Nicodemus

Now the reason that we may find the passage hard to understand is that Jesus was talking to one of the sharpest minds in Jerusalem. The passage has a lot about ‘new birth’, and some very active Christians go about asking, ‘Have you been born again?’ For some, the moment they accept Christ as their Lord and Saviour can be quite traumatic, like Saul on the road to Damascus. He went blind and changed his name to Paul.

For me, and I am sure it is the same for many, it was not traumatic, as although I was only a school boy, I had come to believe and trust in God over a period of time. What matters most, is not that you can remember and define the time when you were reborn or ‘born from above’, but that you are alive now, and that your present life, day by day and moment by moment, is showing evidence of health and strength and purpose of living in the way that God intends.

Where there are signs of life, it’s more important to feed and nurture it, than to spend much time going over and over what happened at the moment of birth. In fact, what Jesus says to Nicodemus is more sharply focused than we sometimes think. The Judaism that Nicodemus and Jesus both knew had a good deal to do with being born into the right family.
Being born from above is different.

To bring people into the kingdom-movement we have the baptism in water begun by John the Baptist and continued by Jesus’ disciples, and today we will be welcoming Natasha into the Church when she is baptised later.

Closely joined to the water baptism, is the baptism in the spirit, the new life, bubbling up from within, that Jesus offers. In this passage, Jesus is explaining how this double-sided new birth, which brings you into the visible community of Jesus’ followers, firstly water-baptism and then spirit baptism, which gives you the new life of the spirit welling up inside you, that both were now required for membership into God’s kingdom.
Indeed (as Jesus says in verse 3), without it you can’t even see God’s kingdom. You can’t glimpse it, let alone get into it.

But the point of this is that God’s kingdom is now thrown open to anyone and everyone. The spirit is on the move, like a fresh spring breeze, and no human family, tribe, or gathering can keep up with it. (It is interesting to note that the word for ‘wind’, in both Hebrew and Greek, is the same word as you’d use for ‘spirit’). Opening the window and letting the breeze in can sometimes be inconvenient, especially for the Nicodemuses of this world who suppose they have got everthing tidied up, labelled and sorted into neat piles. But unless we are prepared to listen to this dangerous message we aren’t ready to listen to the gospel at all.

In verses 10-13 we have the first of many passages in which Jesus speaks about a new knowledge – indeed, a new sort of knowing. It’s a way of knowing that comes from God, from heaven. It’s humbling for Nicodemus to have to be told this. He is, after all, a respected and senior teacher. But this way of knowing, and the new knowledge we get through it, is given by the mysterious ‘son of man’, God in human form. And I would suggest that it is from this new way of knowing that we get our first understanding of the truth about the Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit working together in love.

Do not expect to fully understand the mystery that the Trinity is, just believe and accept that Jesus and God and the Holy Spirit work together divinely as one.  In the first chapter of John we are told that, Jesus is now the ladder which joins the two dimensions of God’s world, the heavenly and the earthly. If we want to understand not only the heavenly world, but the way in which God is now joining heaven and earth together, we must listen to him, and walk with him on the road he will show us.

Jesus then reflects back to the Book of Numbers and the time when the Israelites were wandering in the wilderness. They grumbled against Moses, and poisonous snakes invaded their camp, killing many of them. God gave Moses the remedy: he was to make a serpent out of bronze, put it on a pole and hold it up for people to look at. Anyone who looked at the serpent on the pole would live. The serpent entwined around the pole, is still used as a symbol and as a sign of healing, and is used by various medical organizations, including the medical branches of the armed services.
In this verse, Jesus is clearly pointing to his own death.

Moses put the serpent on a pole, and lifted it up so the people could see it;
even so, the son of man must be lifted up, so that everyone who believes in him may have eternal life. Humankind as a whole has been smitten with the deadly disease of sin. The only cure is to look at the son of man dying on the cross, and find life through believing in him. This is very deep and mysterious, but we must ask: how can the crucifixion of Jesus be like putting the snake on a pole?

But evil isn’t then healed, as it were, automatically. Precisely because the evil of sin lurks deep within each of us, for healing to take place we must ourselves be involved in the process. This doesn’t mean that we just have to try a lot harder to be good. You might as well try to teach a snake to sing. All we can do, just as it was all the Israelites could do, is to look and trust:
to look at Jesus, to see in him the full display of God’s saving love, and to trust in him. .

In the first chapter of John, he speaks of the great divide, which he describes in terms of darkness and light. Believing in Jesus means coming to the light, the light of God’s new creation. Not believing means remaining in the darkness. The darkness (and those who embrace it) must be condemned. It must be condemned because evil is destroying and defacing the present world, and preventing people coming forward into God’s new world (into ‘eternal life’; that is, the life of the age to come). ‘God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him’. The point of the whole story is that you don’t have to be condemned. You don’t have to let the snake kill you. God’s action in the crucifixion of Jesus has planted a sign in the middle of history.

And the sign says: believe, and live.

AMEN.

Back from Chicago!

Veronica has been in the Chicago area to witness and celebrate the graduation of Dawn Biza as a Bachelor of Arts at Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois. Dawn and her mother Betty were parishioners at Veronica’s former parish of Emmanuel, Forest Gate (London) and have made a number of visits to St Oswald’s.

Dawn’s hands are making the Delta sign.

Veronica met with the Dean of Springfield Cathedral…

… and explored Chicago.

Dawn’s house-mates graduated at the same time.

Macclesfield Deanery Prayer Walk

Bishop Libby and Archdeacon Ian are in the process of visiting all the Deaneries in their care as part of “Thy Kingdom Come”. On Wednesday 9 May they led a Prayer Walk through Macclesfield Deanery. They started at Rainow Church and ended at the Hope Centre café at Park Green, Macclesfield. The route was organised by Taffy Davies.

Matthew and Isabella married!

Matt and Issy had their civil (legal) wedding in Issy’s home town of Koessen in the Austrian Tirol. Their marriage will be blessed in the UK later this year. We haven’t seen the “official” photos yet, but here is a selection of snaps

Extracts from the Vicar’s Annual Report 2018

Firstly I would like to thank all those who have faithfully worshipped together and served God here in so many and varied ways here at St Oswald’s during the past year. Without the selfless individual and corporate exercise of your gifts and talents, our church and community life would be so much the poorer, far less effective and certainly not half as much fun! Over the past twelve months we have been blessed with engaging and challenging preaching, from both our newly licensed Readers, Anne and Brian, as well as from Canon Roy, even when he has been enduring a tiresome burden of ill-health over such a prolonged period. We continue to benefit hugely from the work and dedication of Beverley, our Children & Families’ Worker, and the other willing volunteers who enable us to offer care and support for a whole variety of young people and families.

We have held several “firsts” of what we hope might become regular features of our life and worship, including our Pet Service in July (particularly popular with the dogs who enthusiastically applauded when invited to do so by the Vicar) and featuring a local friendly llama; several delicious servings of Sunday Afternoon Teas & Cakes over the summer months, including the opportunity to have a go at ringing the hand bells; our Teddy Bears’ Picnic in November (with an engaging re-enactment of the story of Goldilocks and The Three Bears by some of our young Puppet Group members); our accomplished Children’s Choir, an excellent initiative of Suzie one of our young mums; our emerging young Servers’ Team who now assist at the altar for most of our main Sunday Eucharistic services (and not forgetting Toby who got up early enough to be boat-boy, assisting our thurifer Matthew at the Dawn Eucharist on Easter Day!); our “Big Brekkie” for Christian Aid Week (hosted by Lorraine); and an enjoyable autumn Parish Pilgrimage Walk from Prestbury to Bollington going “the pretty way”, thanks to our intrepid leaders Ruth and Kerrian.

All these activities of course go alongside the regular tasks of maintenance and care of our church building, its effects and adornments, and its surrounding gardens, not to mention those who keep an eye on (and actively help tend) our Churchyard and Columbarium at St John’s in Church Street. Thanks to so many of you who give your time and effort to keep us functioning well, often working quietly behind the scenes, including those who take the trouble regularly to open and close the church on Wednesdays to allow other people to enjoy coming in during the day simply to pray or meditate as they wish. Thank you to the PCC and Deanery Synod members, the various cleaning teams, the church linens’ laundress, the flower arrangers, the musicians and choir members, our readers and intercessors, our caterers and washers-up, our Deputy Wardens and Vergers, the Website Manager, our weekly sheet printer and other publicity people, Katharine our longsuffering Church News Editor and her team, our Sidespeople and Sacristy assistants, Maggie our GAP co-ordinator, Bev our Safeguarding Officer, Julie our PCC and Deanery Synod Secretary, Sally our Treasurer and the wider finance team including Ann, Janet and Chris our Parish Giving Officer, Allen our sexton, Jean our Faith Hour leader, our Christian Aid Co-ordinators Richard, Margaret and Anthea and all the street collectors, our WHAM Nightshelter and Street Angels volunteers, our CHUB outing co-ordinators, and so many others, too numerous to mention but nonetheless appreciated!

Our ministry and outreach in this parish greatly benefits from our two church schools and our links across the whole Bollington Family of Schools, including our continuing close relationship with Dean Valley Community School. It is great to be able to report that both Bollington Cross School and Bollington St John’s School received excellent results from the statutory Church Schools’ SIAMS inspections carried out through the Diocese during the past twelve months. We are blessed in having hugely dedicated staff, parents and governors, whose efforts combine to offer a good and inspirational education to all the children of Bollington. We said a sad but fond farewell to Mrs Julie Downing who retired from Bollington Cross School in July 2017 after 15 years’ dedicated service, but were delighted to welcome Mr Yenson Donbavand as her equally energetic and innovative successor as Head Teacher in September 2017. Please also uphold in your prayers the children, governors and staff of Bollington St John’s School, and in particular Mrs Melanie Walker our excellent Head Teacher there, who continues to develop Bollington St John’s in educationally imaginative and financially effective ways, enabling the school to go from strength to strength since the dissolution of the Federation which took effect at the behest of Pott Shrigley School on 28 February 2017. Last summer we invited over 300 of our primary school children to take part in another Schools’ Experience Week, following the Story of Moses, complete with searching the bullrushes, praying beside the burning bush, enduring the plagues, enjoying a Passover feast, daring the crossing of the Red Sea and finally receiving the Ten Commandments. Special thanks to Bev, Hilary, David and Becca for enabling another memorable Experience!

As you are aware, our architect’s outline plans for the Kitchen Development Mission Project have now been given the blessing of the PCC and it is exciting to announce that more than one third of the cost of this Mission Project will be met by the recent grant of £20,000 we have now successfully claimed from the Diocese. So as we anticipate hosting another range of enticing events during the next Bollington Festival in May 2019, we are keen to bring in the necessary remainder of the funds to enable the development of our new kitchen to be completed in time! Over this coming year may we rise to this renewed challenge, alongside our everyday fundraising needs, and so enhance our capacity for hospitality and service towards others, all for the bringing about of God’s Kingdom here on earth, as it is in heaven.
Finally, I would like once again to express my sincere thanks to our two dedicated and equally hardworking Churchwardens, Christine and Hilary, who have greatly encouraged me in my calling as your parish priest (now beginning my twelfth year here!) and who, alongside the other members of your Ministry Team, continue to share a positive vision for the future thriving and growth of our church community here in Bollington and beyond.

Every blessing,
Veronica