17th Sunday after Trinity 2018

Brian Reader

Wisdom 1:16-2.1, 12-22; or Jeremiah 11.18-22; Ps54;
James 3:13-4.3, 7-8a; Mark 9: 30-37.

As we approach Bible Sunday, have you ever thought that today we have the ability to get closer to the Gospels than at any time in the past?

Firstly, I believe that scholarship and research has given us the best translations and commentaries that there have ever been, and secondly, modern technology, gives us easy access to the web which enables us to source that information whenever we wish. But, I would suggest, we rarely seek to find that Bible information, but rather seek the easier options of contact with friends, photos, games or support of our busy lives. Not that that is wrong, no this is just a reminder, that today we don’t have to carry a Bible with us, all we need to know can be found on the web.

Today on the back of our news sheet there are four related Bible readings. We heard passages from Jeremiah, James and Mark but didn’t hear the passage from Wisdom. Can I recommend that you all take the sheet home with you, and for homework, read the passage from Wisdom?

So what can be said about our Gospel for today? This story is also recorded in the Gospels of Luke and Matthew, so the early Christians must have thought it worthy of note. Last week Veronica was telling us about Jesus teaching the crowds, but this passage from Mark tells how Jesus is now trying to teach his disciples. First he takes them away from the crowds because what he has to tell them cannot be said openly, because the scribes and the Pharisees are seeking to find evidence against him. Also the teaching method has changed. Usually Jesus teaches people by parables, interesting stories which have a hidden religious meaning. Now he speaks to them directly. “The Son of Man is to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him …!”

He will be handed over; he will be killed; he will rise again. Why couldn’t they understand?

Because no such fate could possibly have been part of their understanding of what role a Messiah might have. Why should they, or more to the point, how could they, be expected to understand? Education by the priests in the temple was for the rich, for the others they would be taught by their parents about the law and something of the Old Testament stories. They had been taught that the Jews were waiting for a Messiah to lead them into their Glory Days again. They had accepted Jesus as this new prophet, but did not expect him to be captured and put to death; and how could anyone rise from death? Perhaps Jesus was speaking in riddles again, how could they tell? And yet they were afraid to ask.

But something must have stuck. If Jesus is going to die, who will take over? And Jesus was aware of this undercurrent and discussion and asked them about it. But most probably, because they were ashamed, they did not answer him. But Jesus knew and turned it into another training opportunity, saying that, ‘Whoever wants to be first, must be last of all, and servant of all.” And to make the point even clearer he put a young child in their midst. Now many scholars believe that the verses from Mark 9:37 and 10:15, have been accidentally reversed in the past. They both speak about children, but if reversed back, the subject matter fits in better with the context. So the last verse would become; (from Mark 10:15) ‘I am telling you the truth: anyone who doesn’t receive the kingdom of God like a child will never get into it’.

This certainly makes more sense as, at this point, Jesus is teaching his disciples about humility. At this stage we should not only sympathize with the disciples; we must also ask ourselves whether we would have done the same thing. When God is trying to say something to us, how good are we at listening? Is there something in scripture, or something we’ve heard in church, or something we sense going on around us, through which God is trying to speaking to us? And if so, are we prepared to listen to it? Are we willing to have our earlier ways of understanding things taken apart so that a new way of understanding can open up instead?

A sign that the answer may still be ‘no’ is if, we like the disciples, are still concerned about our own status, about what’s in it for us. If we think that by following Jesus we will enhance our own prestige, or our sense of self-worth, then we’re very unlikely to be able to hear what God is actually saying.

Certainly Jesus must have been frustrated and disappointed that the disciples could only worry about their own relative status. How often do we need to be taught this lesson? I remember, with regret, how I got quite jealous that a lady who became a Christian quite late in life, appeared to be making more progress in her Spiritual life than I was. And I was a Lay Reader! And then I remembered, ‘anyone who doesn’t receive the kingdom of God like a child will never get into it’.

That’s the trouble with understanding only half the message – the half that the disciples and we want to understand. If Jesus is Messiah and king, then aren’t we all royal courtiers-in-waiting? In other words, anyone at all associated with Jesus can become the means of access to royalty, and even to divinity. So the disciples aren’t special in that sense at all.

Mark relates in the following chapters how the disciples continue with the same idea in their heads, until the shocking truth dawns. The Messiah will be captured, tried and killed.

To try to jolt them out of their upside-down thinking, Jesus, not for the last time, uses a child as a teaching aid. Aside from normal family affection, children were not rated highly in the ancient world; they had no status or prestige.

This lesson resonates down through the centuries of church history in which so many have thought that being close to Jesus, even working full-time for him, somehow made them special. Those who have really understood his message know that things just aren’t like that. When Jesus went to the cross, everything his disciples had imagined was turned upside down, and he is still turning upside down the way people think, including Christians. If we feel sorry for the disciples in their confusion, should we not ask ourselves just how confused we still are?

Do you think that you know all you need to know, or do you still want to learn? If you are no longer learning then you are not growing. Don’t you realise that we all still need help to live the true Christian life? Being child-like does not mean being childish, it means wanting to grow up. Don’t you too really want to grow up to the full-grown stature of a mature child of God?

When a fond relative asks a child, ‘What are you going to be when you grow up?’ they really mean, ‘What are you going to do?’ We are obsessed with ‘doing’ more than ‘being’ but what you are is more important than what you do. A proper answer to that question would be, ‘A man’; or ‘A woman’. However, the best answer is, ‘To be like Jesus’.

The best thing is we all still can be. Just accept Jesus into your life as a child, and ask Him to be your friend and Saviour.

AMEN

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