Launch of the Bollington Dementia Action Alliance

Wednesday 13 November at St Oswald’s 6.00pm – 7.30 pm

YOU are invited to attend!

Open Invitation to the official launch. The launch will allow the Alliance to brief on our work to date and plans for the future. Your views and observations will help us shape our forward plans. Teas and coffees, light refreshments and sparkling wine will be available during the event.

Gill Lancaster and Roland Edwards

Please contact either Gill or Roland to confirm your attendance (click on one or other of the names to send an e-mail). This will allow us to make the necessary catering arrangements. Please reply by 10 November.

Closure of Bollington Mothers’ Union Branch

As reported in our Annual report “it is with regret that we announce that this Branch has now discontinued our monthly meetings. The sad decision was taken due to a significant fall in membership (including the deaths of two faithful members from our congregation) and the difficulty of maintaining a regular programme of meetings alongside our other commitments.”

A closing service was held at St Oswald’s on Tuesday 28 May 2019 while celebrating our local Deanery MU Festival that evening.

Ever-loving Father,
we thank you for the work and witness of the Bollington branch of the Mothers’ Union:
for all by which it is remembered,
for all that it meant to those who belonged to it,
and those who were in any way helped by its members,
and for everything in its life which reflected your mercy and love.
We pray for the members who have departed this life,
and for those who have moved away.
We recall the happy times in the past.

St John’s Church Choir – 1965(ish)

The picture includes the curate Revd John Richard Haynes, who was at St John’s from 1963 to 1967, so the picture must be from that period.

Back Row from left: Christopher Patrick, Guy Gorham, ?, Frank Pegg, Fred Hutchinson, Frank Green, ? , John Brogden, Gwilym Humphreys, ?

Middle row from left: Pat Kershaw, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, Harry Holland, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, Jaqueline Clayton (Pengelly)

Front row from left: ?, ?, Edward Heaps?, ?, ?, Geoff Newcombe, Revd J St H Mullett, Albert Clayton, Revd J R Haynes, Barry Patrick?, Hedley Patrick.

More detail: Guy Gorham was the great-grandson of Revd George Cornelius Gorham, who caused a great controversy in the Church of England in 1847 when he was accused of holding Calvanistic views on Baptism (“The Gorham Case“). Fred Hutchinson was a Police Constable. Gwilym Humphreys was headmaster of St John’s School. Harry Holland was the verger. Edward Heaps was the organist (and is presumably third from left in the front row, wearing an organist’s sleeveless surplice). Geoff Newcombe and Albert Clayton were the wardens. Revd John Haynes went to Rhodesia/Zimbabwe for 20 years from 1970 before returning to the UK as vicar of Bishop’s Stortford. He retired to Scarborough where he died in 2016. You can read more about Revd John St Hilary MULLETT and other former vicars here.

If YOU can supply any more details about the photo, please let us know.

Vicar’s Letter – November/December 2018

As the clocks change and the nights are drawing in, we can be forgiven for turning inwards on ourselves. We think of building up provisions in the freezer or store-cupboard in anticipation of winter snows, or shopping early to beat the Christmas rush. We delve into the wardrobe for a familiar warm coat to wrap up in again, or maybe go off to the splendid Bridgend Centre to find a replacement! We dig out that well-worn Christmas card list which brings to mind good times we’ve shared with old friends and acquaintances.

The Church’s own calendar of festivals marks the passing of another year. With bright-eyed children at our Light Party on All Hallows’ Eve, 31 October, we celebrate all the Saints of God, well-known or obscure, in whose lives we have glimpsed the compassion and challenge of Christ. On the evening of All Souls’ Day, 2 November, we bring to mind those closest of our friends and family whose passing we mourn, entrusting their souls once again to God’s infinite care as we light a candle in their memory. A few days later, we hear fireworks in our neighbourhood, celebrating the joyful life we can share with friends around us. Perhaps we write our own names with sparklers in the light of a bonfire, as we focus our attention on the complexities of world politics, historically and in the present day. On Armistice Day, 11 November, we will parade solemnly with those poignantly resilient poppies on our lapels, and hold respectfully before God, in the three minutes’ silence, the lives of those who died or who returned maimed in body, mind or spirit, praying that we do not squander their hard-won peace. As we continue to teach our children St Oswald’s motto urging them to be strong and of good courage and to follow paths of gentleness and peace, so let us pray for strength and resourcefulness for ourselves and our community as we look for ways to enhance the well-being of all those around us and across the wider world, who are still living in poverty or dire need as a result of violent conflict or war, human cruelty, greed or selfishness.

Our solemn mood will be lightened by joining in one of the two Christingle services now offered on Advent Sunday afternoon, 2 December, taking carefully into our hands those familiar bright orange candle-holders, studded with delicious symbols of the fruits of the earth, anticipating Christ’s light dawning into the world and blessed by the music and song of so many children and families from our local schools. During the next four weeks leading up to Christmas, we may begin to look inwards at our own lives and perhaps examine our consciences in response to new awareness of climate change (highlighted by the Transition Bollington group), challenged as we must be by our children’s persistent awkward questions about our collective choice of lifestyle. We might decide to volunteer as a Street Angel or at our Winter Night Shelter project for homeless men run by members of the churches in and around Macclesfield. Before we are tempted to close the door to keep out any more chilling thoughts about the imbalance and inequality of our world, we may yet dare to hold it ajar a little longer, by venturing into one of our local churches once in a while to sit quietly and pray (remembering that St Oswald’s is open for just that purpose during the day on most Wednesdays). We may be pleasantly surprised to come across others alongside us there, each one trying to make enough room in our busy lives, to be more ready to greet the birth of the Christ Child and to find practical ways of welcoming God’s Spirit of kindness and justice into our hearts and homes again this year.

For 110 years now, St Oswald’s Church, built to the glory of God, has stood beside the main road into and out of Bollington, as a place of witness and welcome, especially for members of the local community wishing to embark on a marriage covenant relationship, or to celebrate the birth of a new baby, or to give thanks for a life now ended that has been well-lived. We share the joy of adults and children finding faith and recognising their essential worth before God. Equally we are here to support and care for those who feel wounded and bruised by their life’s experience. We offer prayers reflecting real anguish as well as hope, and we continue to reach out in all humility with empathy, comfort, friendliness and a listening ear to young and old alike. May God prosper our visionary plans to continue to improve the welcome we can offer within our church building, and may we always be mindful to look up and keep good company with one another as we follow the star which leads us to Christ, who is the same source of love, light and truth, yesterday, today and forever.

Every blessing,
Veronica

Poppy Appeal Launch 2018

Lyric by Joe Riley:

We all know about the traumas of the war,
But do we know about the things that happened after or before;
The people who’d seen horror,
Lived hell upon the earth;
But I can see in you and me that the aftermath was not to be heard;

Poor James, Poor John,
Can you show a bit more sympathy for the people who’d be rather dead than living;
I’m shocked, appalled,
At them all for sending home,
Broken lives and empty minds;
How did their families survive;

Who knew that time,
Would pass you by so quickly;
Think we’ve seen bad things,
But have we, have we really?
That’s why we’re here,
To think of all those people,
How did they carry on, how did they carry on?

Some say that it was such a horrid time,
But we know, that they’re wrong ‘cause there are simply no words left to describe;
The kind of pain and fear that they saw,
Would scar them ‘til the day that they would lie inside their morgue, oh

Poor James, Poor John,
Can you show a bit more sympathy for the people who’d be rather dead than living;
I’m shocked, appalled,
At them all for sending home,
Broken lives and empty minds;
How did their families survive;

Who knew that time,
Would pass you by so quickly;
Think we’ve seen bad things,
But have we, have we really?
That’s why we’re here,
To think of all those people,
How did they carry on, how did they carry on?

How did they carry on?

Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh

How did they carry on?

Poppy Appeal 2018 – Launch in Bollington

This year, the annual Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal  has a particular resonance as we reach the Centenary of the Armistice to end WW1.

The Poppy Appeal in Bollington and district will be officially launched in Bollington at 10.30am on Saturday 27 November at St Oswald’s Church at Bollington Cross.

After a brief introduction by the Poppy Appeal Organiser Debra Nixon, Canon Veronica Hydon will offer a prayer and read some verses of WW1 poetry. There will be a song by Joe Riley, followed by a short period of silence for reflection. A prayer will be said by Veronica commissioning the Poppy Collection volunteers and blessing them in their task. We will then all sing a new hymn which has been specially composed for this Armistice Day.

Tea and coffee will be available after this brief ceremony.

Please come and attend this Launch to support and encourage the volunteers, but also to remind ourselves of the value of the Peace that most of those of us in this country are able to enjoy.

You can read about the men from Bollington who served in WW1 here.