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St Oswald's

The parish church of Bollington

Bollington Road, Bollington Cross, SK10 5EG
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Sing-Along Hymns

The Salvation Army

William Booth (1829–1912) was a Methodist preacher who, along with his wife, Catherine (1829–1890), founded The Salvation Army and became its first General. This Christian movement with a quasi-military structure and government founded in 1865 has spread from London to many parts of the world and is known for being one of the largest distributors of humanitarian aid. He died on 20 August and he is commemorated on this day in the Church of England Calendar.

Here are some hymns from the Salvation Army Hymn Book.

Scroll down for more hymns).

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I love to hear the story

The words were written by the American Emily [Huntington] Miller (1833-1913). She was the daughter of a Methodist Pastor, Revd Thomas Huntington. She was an Associate Editor of The Ladies’ Home Journal and a leader of the Temperance Movement in USA.

The tune Angels’ Story was written for this hymn by the English organist and composer Arthur Henry Mann (1850-1929). It is his best-known tune. His most important musical role was as organist and director of music at King’s College Chapel, Cambridge from 1876 until 1929. He was the founder director of the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols (first performance in 1918).

I love to hear the story
Which angel voices tell,
How once the King of Glory
Came down on earth to dwell;
I am both weak and sinful,
But this I surely know:
The Lord came down to save me
Because he loved me so.

I’m glad my blessèd Saviour
Was once a child like me,
To show how pure and holy
His little ones might be;
And if I try to follow
His footsteps here below,
He never will forsake me
Because he loves me so.

To sing his love and mercy
My sweetest songs I’ll raise;
For though I cannot see him,
I know he hears my praise;
And mine his loving promise
That even I may go
To sing among the angels,
Because he loves me so.

Angels’ Story

I hear Thy welcome voice

Words and music by Revd Lewis Hartsough (1828-1919), an American Methodist evangelist and gospel song writer who was ordained in 1853. This is the hymn for which he is best known.

I hear Thy welcome voice
that calls me, Lord, to Thee
for cleansing in Thy precious blood
that flowed on Calvary.
I am coming, Lord!
Coming now to Thee!
Wash me, cleanse me in the blood
that flowed on Calvary.

Though coming weak and vile,
Thou dost my strength assure;
Thou dost my vileness fully cleanse,
Till spotless all and pure.
I am coming, Lord!
Coming now to Thee!
Wash me, cleanse me in the blood
that flowed on Calvary.

‘Tis Jesus calls me on
to perfect faith and love,
to perfect hope, and peace, and trust,
for earth and heaven above.
I am coming, Lord!
Coming now to Thee!
Wash me, cleanse me in the blood
that flowed on Calvary.

‘Tis Jesus who confirms
the blessed work within,
by adding grace to welcomed grace,
where reigned the power of sin.
I am coming, Lord!
Coming now to Thee!
Wash me, cleanse me in the blood
that flowed on Calvary.

All hail, atoning blood!
All hail, redeeming grace!
All hail, the gift of Christ, our Lord,
our strength and righteousness.
I am coming, Lord!
Coming now to Thee!
Wash me, cleanse me in the blood
that flowed on Calvary.

I hear Thy welcome voice

What a friend we have in Jesus

The Irish poet Joseph Medlicott Scriven (1819–1886) certainly suffered some trials and trouble in his personal life. His fiancée accidentally drowned in 1843, the night before they were to be married. He emigrated to Canada. In 1855, he received news that his mother was very ill back in Ireland. He wrote a poem to comfort her called Pray Without Ceasing. The poem later became this hymn, although that was not his intention. In 1860 he was again preparing to marry when his new fiancée contracted pneumonia and died shortly after. He was suffering from depression at the end of his life. He was found drowned and it was never established whether he died by accident or suicide.

The traditional tune Converse was written by Charles Crozat Converse (1832–1918). He was an American attorney, who had studied law and music at Leipzig. He composed a number of hymn tunes.

The modern tune Manor House was written about 1960 by Frederick G Carter (1913-1998). It was quite likely written for this hymn.

What a friend we have in Jesus,
all our sins and griefs to bear!
What a privilege to carry
everything to God in prayer!
O what peace we often forfeit,
O what needless pain we bear,
all because we do not carry
everything to God in prayer!

Have we trials and temptations?
Is there trouble anywhere?
We should never be discouraged;
take it to the Lord in prayer!
Can we find a friend so faithful
who will all our sorrows share?
Jesus knows our every weakness:
take it to the Lord in prayer!

Are we weak and heavy-laden,
cumbered with a load of care?
Jesus is our only refuge:
take it to the Lord in prayer!
Do your friends despise, forsake you?
Take it to the Lord in prayer:
in his arms he’ll take and shield you;
you will find a solace there.

Converse

Manor House

I need Thee every hour

Annie Sherwood Hawks (1836-1918) wrote many hymns, but this is the best known. Sherwood was her surname before marriage. A resident of New York, she attended the Hanson Place Baptist church, where Revd Dr Robert Lowry(1826-1899) was the pastor. He encouraged her hymn writing and he wrote the music for the hymn and also added the refrain. The hymn was published in 1872.

He wrote both words and music for Low in the grave he lay, which is in our hymn-book, and Shall we gather by the river?, which is not.

I need Thee every hour, most gracious Lord;
No tender voice like Thine can peace afford.
I need Thee, O I need Thee, every hour I need Thee;
O bless me now, my Saviour, I come to Thee!

I need Thee every hour, stay Thou near by;
Temptations lose their power when Thou art nigh.
I need Thee, O I need Thee, every hour I need Thee;
O bless me now, my Saviour, I come to Thee!

I need Thee every hour, in joy or pain;
Come quickly and abide, or life is vain.
I need Thee, O I need Thee, every hour I need Thee;
O bless me now, my Saviour, I come to Thee!

I need Thee every hour, teach me Thy will;
And Thy rich promises in me fulfil.
I need Thee, O I need Thee, every hour I need Thee;
O bless me now, my Saviour, I come to Thee!

I need Thee every hour, most Holy One;
O make me Thine indeed, Thou blessed Son!
I need Thee, O I need Thee, every hour I need Thee;
O bless me now, my Saviour, I come to Thee!

I need Thee every hour

Softly and tenderly Jesus is calling

It is thought that Will Lamartine Thompson (1847-1909) wrote both the words and the music for this hymn.

There are a number of versions of the hymn available on YouTube. My own favourite is the one by Jim Reeves (1923–1964).

Softly and tenderly Jesus is calling,
Calling for you and for me!
Patiently Jesus is waiting and watching,
Watching for you and for me!
Come home, come home!
Ye who are weary, come home!
Earnestly, tenderly, Jesus is calling,
Calling, O sinner, come home!

Why should we tarry when Jesus is pleading,
Pleading for you and for me?
Why should we linger and heed not his mercies,
Mercies for you and for me?
Come home, come home!
Ye who are weary, come home!
Earnestly, tenderly, Jesus is calling,
Calling, O sinner, come home!

O for the wonderful love he has promised,
Promised for you and for me!
Though we have sinned, he has mercy and pardon,
Pardon for you and for me!
Come home, come home!
Ye who are weary, come home!
Earnestly, tenderly, Jesus is calling,
Calling, O sinner, come home!

Softly and tenderly

For each hymn we have provided a set of verses together with an electronically generated sound-track. The sound track does not provide any words - just the tune.

The selection of hymns to be included was subject to certain limitations, notably the restrictions of copyright. This meant that many modern hymns were excluded, and the exclusion even applied to some updated versions of traditional hymns. Some publishers have made a few minor changes to make hymns more "inclusive" and have then claimed copyright over the revised text. So in most cases the ORIGINAL texts have been used, even though these may not be the versions that appear in modern hymnals.

In deciding what tunes to be used, this has largely been the Webmaster's personal choice. It is a mixture of familiar tunes and tunes that are not well-known, but deserve to be better known. The webmaster has included some personal favourites (and excluded some pet hates!). The soundtracks provided go with the words provided - if there are four verses, the tune is repeated four times. Where possible tunes have been provided with descants or alternative arrangements.

Wherever possible, there is an explanation of who wrote the words or tunes, the circumstances under which they were written, when (and sometimes why). Many hymns include references to verses appearing in the King James Version of the Bible; more modern translations were not then available! In some cases we have tried to explain these scriptural references or other instances where words have changed their meaning over time.

This selection of "Sing-along Songs of Praise" was originally a series of blog posts written during the COVID Lockdowns of 2020. It was intended to allow people to sing hymns in the safety and privacy of their own homes at a time when hymn-singing in church was not allowed (even if the church building was open!).

When hymns are sung as part of a church service, it is normally the case that the hymn books are set aside at the end of the hymn and the next part of the service continues. There is no time to sit and reflect on the meaning or the beauty of words and/or music. This collection allows you to take your time, to read, listen sing along, reflect, and to repeat a hymn again if you wish.

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Last modified: 24 February 2021